Students with hearing disabilities face unique challenges inside the classroom. Many common learning modes that people take for granted — lectures, discussion groups and even one-on-one conversations — can be a struggle for those who have any level of hearing difficulty. However, that doesn’t mean a college degree is out of reach. Today’s wide range of tools, devices and systems can help students who are deaf or hard of hearing thrive in an educational setting. This guide focuses on those resources, tech tools and expert tips that students of all ages can use achieve academic success.

Success for students with hearing loss -Click here for Success for Students with Hearing Loss

This online resource offers a plethora of information for both parents and professionals.  Although there is a paid membership option that offers members to receive newsletters, access the online archives, and instructional activities and strategies, there is great information that can be accessed for free. 

 

Breaking the sound barrier -Click here for Breaking the Sound Barrier

This blog was created and is maintained by a deaf person and her decision to pursue cochlear implants.  She has organized a great wealth of information on her blog and offers great insight from her perspective on her journey to hearing.  Recommended apps and websites are listed, as well as her documented blog of almost two years.  The author of this blog has pertinent resources for further information listed, such as medic-alert bracelets, “Deaf for a Day” challenge, and other useful blogs that are chockfull of information as well.

CICircle and ListenUp Listserves  - cicircle (parents of children with cochlear implants)

For parents seeking support and advice from other parents, the internet has connected parents faced with similar challenges as never before.  Cicircle is an online support listserv for parents of children with cochlear implants and listen-up is a listserv for parents of children with hearing aids.  Parents can post a problem or question onto the listserv and receive responses almost immediately.  Parents share useful information such as troubleshooting, sharing of knowledgeable professionals, and support for parents when they encounter difficulties in their child’s academic plans with the school district.  Parents should be made aware of these supports available to them.  This support requires a participant to have a yahoo email account, and I would recommend that email account be dedicated for this purpose only.  If the links above do not work, find this group by typing “cicircle” or “listen-up” in the search box of yahoo.  Participants must request to join the group.  

Click here for CICircle  - 

Listen-Up (Parents of hearing aid users)

Click here for Listen Up

For parents seeking support and advice from other parents, the internet has connected parents faced with similar challenges as never before.  Cicircle is an online support listserv for parents of children with cochlear implants and listen-up is a listserv for parents of children with hearing aids.  Parents can post a problem or question onto the listserv and receive responses almost immediately.  Parents share useful information such as troubleshooting, sharing of knowledgeable professionals, and support for parents when they encounter difficulties in their child’s academic plans with the school district.  Parents should be made aware of these supports available to them.  This support requires a participant to have a yahoo email account, and I would recommend that email account be dedicated for this purpose only.  If the links below do not work, find this group by typing “cicircle” or “listen-up” in the search box of yahoo.  Participants must request to join the group.  Parent blogs through cicircle can be found at:

Click here for CICircle parent blogs

Cochlear Implant School Kit -http://cischooltoolkit.com/q/teachers/

For many professionals in the mainstream setting, they have had little exposure to students with hearing aids and/or cochlear implants.  For children with deafness or hearing loss, it is imperative that educational staff supporting those students be well versed in how to effectively address their specific needs.  This resource provides lessons, complete with YouTube videos, to education those who are unfamiliar with the needs of d/hh learners.  This website is appropriate for professionals, parents, and even kids!  Pass it along to professionals working with your children!

Deaf Education – www.Deafed.net

This website offers a wealth of information.  There are links to access jobs, learning, collaborative opportunities, and topics for discussions.  There are a number of links for further information provided on this website, as well as relevant information posted for easy access.

Hands and Voices – www.handsandvoices.org

This is one of the most comprehensive and easily navigated websites regarding deafness and hard of hearing supports.  There are links to provide access to local supports, as well as access to resources.  There are local chapters for parents to connect.  Meeting other families will prove invaluable in helping them understand what they can expect as their child grows.  Trouble shooting equipment problems, such as keeping hearing equipment on during sports, or how to fix a malfunctioning problem, will provide them with great information.

GoGrad - http://www.gograd.org/

An easy online platform where aspiring graduate students of all ages, backgrounds, and specialties can get the information they need to make informed decisions about their education. We create in-depth resources, conduct student and alumni interviews, speak with experts in various fields, and develop user-friendly search tools to help prospective grad students vet all their options. 

Alexander Graham Bell – www.agbell.org

AG Bell offers parents information on how to find local support, advocacy support, and connections for students across the country.  Events, such as the 2015 Symposium and LOFT (Leadership Opportunities for Teens), are a great source of support for d/hh children and their families.  Professional and parent training opportunities can be found on this website as well.  This highlights only a few of the valued information accessible geared towards listening and spoken language.

Tools for Schools – Advanced Bionics -Click here for Tools for Schools

For students who pursue a cochlear implant, this is a helpful resource in guiding language development.  This is merely a guideline, but a helpful one at helping to identify how to assist people become successful cochlear implant users.  For people unfamiliar with this process, it outlines the phases of development by isolating targeted areas to support realistic expectations.

Hope Online Courses – Cochlear Americas -http://hope.cochlearamericas.com/online-courses

For professionals wishing to learn more about cochlear implants or other pertinent information, this resource provides access to free webinars.  CEU’s (professional credits) are offered for some of these courses.  There is a library of resources available over the course of many topics.  For professional staff seeking further information, this is a great resource. 

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association – www.asha.org

This resource provides a multitude of information for both parents and professionals.  There are opportunities for furthering knowledge and education through links provided, as well as locating specialists, such as LSLS therapists.  Events, publications, and other pertinent information can be found here.  

The John Tracy Clinic – www.jtc.org

The John Tracy Clinic philosophy encompasses the whole family for success in families who choose an auditory-oral approach to language.  This program focuses on the birth-five years of age range with support provided through center-based programs for local families, long-distance education programs for families who live nationwide, and the International Summer Session where families from around the world participate in a three-week long educational course, inclusive for parents, d/hh preschool children, and siblings from 6-11 years of age.  The long distance program consists of targeted language highlights for parents to integrate in their homes and then email a report on the child’s progress.  The parent will receive a written response back from a JTC professional with information specific to their child.